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Author Topic: Whats in your INCH Bag?  (Read 8638 times)

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graynomad

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2016, 11:06:42 pm »

Yikes, no way I could carry 80+kgs. Mind you nobody should really as it will bugger your back and knees, you must be a big lad Trapper.

That said I can walk indefinitely (well 2 weeks is the longest I've done) with about 25kgs. I reckon it would be easy to stay out for a month or so if you can find water. After that better have a cache, a BOL, know how to hunt, or be ready to retake your compound.

My missus is an entirely different story, so point taken about that.
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2016, 07:21:06 am »

Lol, That 83 kgs would be my wife and almost the 2 kids!
Most regular/ex-regular soldiers have buggered hips, knees, shoulders and ankles and it is mostly caused
by the extreme amount of weight they have been made to carry around on their backs.
I have a mate who was the radio lance jack and his carry load was even worse!
Moving around the country side with a family is not something I want to think about especially while on foot.
Just keep enough gear in backpacks for a couple of days and make it light enough that wife and kids can haul just
the featherweight stuff.
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OzHippy

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2016, 07:24:03 am »

Depending on the terrain, historically fleeing people used wheelbarrows, shopping carts, hand carts to move goods.  I was thinking of getting some short sturdy BMX bicycle wheels to put an back and drag the weight. Even if you have to dismantle and carry over tough terrain in two of three trips.  A quick google search and found great images and a prepper site talking about man powered vehicles.  Can put your not so fit family member on the back - less work than digging the 6 foot hole!!!!!


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OzHippy

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2016, 07:30:13 am »

Why do people always steal my ideas before I have even had them!!  Apologies cant resist images, you can be caveman or reinvent the wheel, one of mans greatest inventions..



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OzHippy

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2016, 07:38:07 am »

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Lol, That 83 kgs would be my wife and almost the 2 kids!
I used to hit the weights in the gym, any person who can bench press and squat his own body weight is starting to get to top fitness.  I think the 83kg should be 83L of gear.  But he is caring a lot of water!! 
If in a group one can reduce load by 50% one carries the pots an pans, the other the axe and machete, another the tarp/tent, first aid etc...  The bigger the group the easier it is.
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2016, 08:51:44 am »

Token only has to carry his rifle!
His wife and 25 kids can handle the rest of gear ;)
Just joking mate!
Kids can carry lighter bedding gear and other small's.
Get a horse and you can carry a lot more or even a mule or donkey.
Worked out well for the old timers and early miners.
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self-sufficient

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2016, 08:54:14 am »

80+ KG that's crazy heavy you must be build like a clydesdale horse.

Dont get me wrong but I feel that other than water (that is incredibly heavy and dense for its size and how much you need in some conditions) Your gear shouldn't weigh that much.

I think I could get away with 15kg + water and even then I would feel held back by cumbersome crap. Perhaps I have a different way of traveling. I'm lean 70kg  can bench my body weight no prob though. Though I like to travel light and fast. Particularly in my area that is very hilly. I grew up in very hilly terrain and feel comfortable with that.

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Lady Tasman

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2016, 09:11:10 am »

Hey guys, excellent comments.
I'm a little wary of separating the contents of INCH bags - like first aid with 1 person, hunting items with another etc. It definitely makes the job easier and you get to take more items, but what happens if for some reason the group is split up? I'd prefer to carry my own.
Which brings me to another point I noticed discussed- the ability of wives to carry gear and walk.
We are fully expecting SOMETHING to happen in the future so shouldn't we be as prepared as possible?
It's all good sitting here reading articles- but if you know your family couldn't survive shouldn't you be preparing them as well as your INCH bags?
Aussies are a mighty unfit group and a huge percentage are overweight or unfit- or both.
I think those with small children or disabled family should think about the need to break getting to locations into smaller sections, with some excellent camouflage used. Providing you are out of immediate danger as long as you're moving forward in an INCH situation you will eventually get where you need to be. We are talking long term relocation after all.
Keeping littlies quiet is another thing to consider. If there is danger behind the next tree for instance.
Do you have a gag? Seriously folks.
You will need to be able to silence and restrain anyone who is unable to comprehend the danger and act accordingly.
Lady T
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Splitter

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2016, 09:36:27 am »

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Hey guys excellent comments.
I'm a little wary of separating the contents of INCH bags - like first aid with 1 person, hunting items with another etc. It definitely makes the job easier and you get to take more items, but what happens if for some reason the group is split up? I'd prefer to carry my own.
Which brings me to another point I noticed discussed- the ability of wives to carry gear and walk.
We are fully expecting SOMETHING to happen in the future so shouldn't we be as prepared as possible?
It's all good sitting here reading articles- but if you know your family couldn't survive shouldn't you be preparing them as well as your INCH bags?
Aussies are a mighty unfit group and a huge percentage are overweight or unfit- or both.
I think those with small children or disabled family should think about the need to break getting to locations into smaller sections, with some excellent camouflage used. Providing you are out of immediate danger as long as you're moving forward in an INCH situation you will eventually get where you need to be. We are talking long term relocation after all.
Keeping littlies quiet is another thing to consider. If there is danger behind the next tree for instance.
Do you have a gag? Seriously folks.
You will need to be able to silence and restrain anyone who is unable to comprehend the danger and act accordingly.
Lady T

Agree with you about splitting up gear if your in a big group
But as a family , I for one wouldn't allow any of us to become seperated, and if it was unfortunately to happen I wouldn't stop till there found.
Single file, wife and I swap ( taking point) depending on terain and local.kids in center.

And about gags and keeping yoyr youngens quiet. There was a thread a bit back that went into it pretty deep and alot of opinions on the matter were expressed. Cant rember the thread of top of my head tho
Ill check through my posts and find it unless anyone can remember.


I prepare my family every day. And they dont even know it :o ;D
And being overweight and unfit. Thankfully isnt something we need to worry about.
But if we were it would be first on my list of improvements to be implemented.
Health and fitness is key in a bugout scenario,  otherwise you fall by the way side and become food for another predator. So to speak. !!.

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graynomad

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2016, 10:02:40 am »

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...
I think I could get away with 15kg + water and even then I would feel held back by cumbersome crap.
...

Last time I weighed stuff was just before a 10-day walk in the mountains. I had 17kgs, including 2-3 liters of water but excluding about 10kgs of camera gear (one of the burdens of being a nature photographer) so 27kgs all up.

Of that food was 7.5kgs (I average 750gms per day), so excluding food/water/cameras we have a pack of  about 7kgs for the very basics. Seems a bit light and I'm going from memory so maybe the water was not included. Anyway certainly in 10kgs you can have everything you need except food and water.

Now my experience is with bushwalking, not bugging out, similar but not the same and you certainly to plan to "come home" when bushwalking :)

Originally I thought, OK, drop the camera gear and use that 10kgs for more food. Trouble is in a real BO situation I would have stuff I don't need when bushwalking, most notably a rifle, pistol and plenty of ammo. That could easily weigh 10kgs so I'm back to where I was.

As I now live in a warm climate (CQ) I may be able to drop 1 or even 2 kgs off my shelter and clothing, OTOH the above load was the same for a 5-day Karijini walk, that's a hot area and I needed everything.



Therefore, until I get around to seriously working up an INCH bag I will go with a minimum weight of 25kgs for everything for 2 weeks (but you must find water).

BTW I have a very light 60l pack, a 150gm sleeping bag, 1.7kg tent, 250gm sleeping mat etc etc. I spent a lot of time tuning my gear to weigh as little as possible. I still wear heavy leather boots though and every pound on your feet = 10 pounds on your back, so that needs to be addressed as well.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2016, 10:04:54 am by graynomad »
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graynomad

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2016, 10:09:41 am »



Here we see my super small sleeping mat, my tent is hidden but it's exactly the same as my mate's behind me (seen with no fly).

This is day 3 into the Karijini walk, the previous photo was day 5 and about 1 hour from the road and a cold beer, I was pretty much over it by then :)
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Mirage

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2017, 08:02:09 am »

Interesting thread.  I don't really see a lot genuine INCH thinking in it.  Most of the chat seems focused on creating an extended BOB rather than a true INCH.  Plenty of these items run out of life/usefulness within a year.  What happens by year 2 or year 5 or year 10?  OzHippy has suggested an interesting book 'the sheltering desert' - a good read.  Here were two blokes in 1940 who took an entire truckload of supplies with them into a remote location to escape interment and were under severe privation by the end of the first year and had to pack it in and return to civilization and the certainty of a prison camp by year 2.  They got quite a bit right ... but enough wrong to bring them down.

For INCH, the theory is you want the tools that enable you to make/acquire more resources and improvise to the maximum. Items should be those required to build permanent shelter and establish small scale agriculture or long term wild harvest of food. So much of the gear discussed in here really only has temporary value or limited purpose.

The other important consideration is what kind of environment your INCH is intended for. 

In my own case, if I have to become a refugee, I'm going back to the central deserts.
Critical pieces of kit for long term survival will be things like rasps, files, fencing pliers, stilsons, high quality hand saws and kit to sharpen and set teeth, leather working tools, some long lengths of good abseiling ropes, a few kilos of salt (to get me started until I begin harvesting my own), the heaviest most durable pot I can find, durable eating utensils. A ye-olde brace and plenty of drills, sharpening stones.  These are the things that make your permanent shelter, secure your water, make and repair your gardening implements, capture your pack animals etc.  Then you need the right kinds of seed for a few staple crops suited to the environment you're going to be in - and the experience growing these crops.

I highly recommend reading plenty of old bushmans accounts pre-1940.  That's where you can get a good feel for whats useful and how to go about living with very little.  Old ag journals pre 1940's are also excellent sources of inspiration.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2017, 08:18:27 am by Mirage »
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OzHippy

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2017, 08:24:18 am »

An example of a family that buged out in Russia and survived for 40years.  They did very well till a crop failed and after winter a few old seeds in the soil sprouted that they kept alive at all cost then rebuilt their seed supply, also their cast iron pot war out and they used pieces of the pot till that eventually failed. 


It is a hard life and as Mirage states you need to take heir loom seeds that so you can have a steady resupply of seeds, and take chickens and or goats with you.  If you are going for long-term wilderness bugout take a lot of gear even if all you mange to do is walk 5km a day.


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Mirage

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2017, 08:58:17 am »

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An example of a family that buged out in Russia and survived for 40years.  They did very well till a crop failed and after winter a few old seeds in the soil sprouted that they kept alive at all cost then rebuilt their seed supply, also their cast iron pot war out and they used pieces of the pot till that eventually failed. 


It is a hard life and as Mirage states you need to take heir loom seeds that so you can have a steady resupply of seeds, and take chickens and or goats with you.  If you are going for long-term wilderness bugout take a lot of gear even if all you mange to do is walk 5km a day.


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Ahhh ... the Lykovs.  Now there is one hard-core group of self sufficient survivors.  Boy were they tough.  Without their staunch religious beliefs they'd probably have perished.
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Arkane

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Re: Whats in your INCH Bag?
« Reply #29 on: August 31, 2017, 09:21:36 am »

As in an INCH bag it is not to completely survive out of!
After an Apocalypse the world will be full of salvage, one will be hard put to find any good farmland that has not got a lot of decent salvage in on or around it!
Why would one disregard all the vacant buildings homesteads barns sheds old steel/iron farm implements etc etc etc!

An INCH bag should only really have knowledge and a few essentials that can not be salvaged!
Stuff like how to make a fire hot enough to melt steel/iron, how to make a sand mould, how to make tools etc!

The ability to cast a decent cooking pot, how to turn a car spring into a hoe, spade, axe etc!
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