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Author Topic: Throwaway gardening  (Read 4344 times)

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graynomad

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2017, 10:53:19 pm »

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Just a bit of chicken wire to keep the turkeys and wallabies away from it and somewhere to climb!
Some water twice a week!
Managable?

Looks like my neighbour and I are going to start a garden, he has a dam so we should be able to keep the water up to it.
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2017, 06:15:23 am »

Congrats Rob! ;)
If you are in a shity decomposing granite area then you can grow fantastic grapes as well mate!
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graynomad

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2017, 07:49:05 am »

Most of the ground here is pretty crap, but there's a spot about 100M away from me (on his land) that looks like pretty good dirt to me. It'll gravity feed from the dam and he has a tractor to rip it up etc, plus he knows a fair bit about growing stuff. I'll just provide labour and some materials.

So maybe it'll be a goer.
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2017, 05:43:24 pm »

Give it a go mate!
And if it falls apart you can just nip through the fence and steal any fruit and veges you need. :o ;D ;D ;D ;D
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crazycatlady

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #19 on: November 06, 2017, 07:05:19 am »

Thought I'd update you - don't bother with carrots, they don't do well enough to waste time.  Onions however are a roaring success and I grew garlic in the white koolite boxes this year and many of them did quite well.  Unfortunately, if they are subject to moisture, they didn't do as well as in the ground so its a bit to do with variety there.  Celery worked well also and I am harvesting celery grown from the base of bought stuff.

So for those of us in the tropics where onions do not ordinarily do well, go with planting the bases and growing on from there.

Also, with no water, weeding or attention, got a great harvest of swedes again this winter.  Please consider these as they are very hardy and outgrow all weeds.  I peel, dice and freeze for use in soups and stews.
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #20 on: November 06, 2017, 07:37:38 am »

I have given up on garlic :(
Spent a fortune on commercial stock and all had wet bum and rotted even with severely reduced watering. I think it is a disease in the soil.
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graynomad

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2017, 11:44:45 am »

We're learning as well. Carrots were crap, potatoes good, tomatoes so good we need to set up a stall out on the highway :)

Pumpkins gone berserk but bugger all actual fruit, butternut pumpkins look like they might be better.

Silver beats and lettuce going gang busters.

I don't want to be a market gardener, if I can 5-10 staples working reliably I will be happy.
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odzy

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2017, 01:57:14 pm »

I too couldn't grow the garlic this year.  It's all waisted  :-[
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sea-dove

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2017, 04:31:12 pm »

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Thought I'd update you - don't bother with carrots, they don't do well enough to waste time.

I don't do well growing carrots either, makes me better hearing that I'm not the only one who has issues with the carrots lol.

I used to thou garden for a lady who was great with growing carrots, she only had them in a small patch but she planted them thick and always had lots of carrots, just would pull whatever she was about to cook.  She actually had her worm farm in ground right next to the carrot bed, so maybe that helped  (her soil was much better then mine). Her worm farm was just a place she put her food scraps and covered with a hessian bag and she always kept the ground under the bag damp. Lots of worms there.

............

I was looking at a very interesting plant on ebay earlier, blackberry jam tree.
"Scientific name: Randia formosa
Synonyms: Mussaenda formosa, Randia mussaenda
Family: Rubiaceae
Common name: Blackberry Jam Fruit, Raspberry Bush, Jasmin de Rosa
Origin: Central and South America "

"
You don't have to make a preserve with this fruit - the fresh pulp tastes exactly like Blackberry Jam. Yet it's not too sweet and actually tastes even better than any preserve. When you see the shrub all covered by yellow fruit, you are anxious to pick, crack open all of them, and suck out the sweet and tasty exotic pulp... This is one of those fun rare fruits than one never gets tired of!"

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login  . The ebay seller has that they grow fine too in temperate climate so should be okay in SA to.  I still got my ebay account screwed up so cant currently order one.

"Starts fruiting in young age - 1-1.5 year from seed. 1-3 gallon container plants start blooming and fruiting when reach about 2 ft tall.
Heavy producer. A small 3 ft plant in 3 gal container can bear as many as 25-30 fruit at a time. Blooming/fruiting period continues for a few months, new flowers appear while the first fruit start to ripen. "   That doesn't sound too bad seeing the fruit is about 1 inch in size each.

I don't do well with growing celery as I never water it enough.  My garlic here thou requires no care at all, its great even with not watering it at all at this time of the year.  I hadn't even weeded around the garlic but it just don't seem to care about the weeds.  (I'm annoyed right now at my wallabies as when I went outside earlier I saw they'd sat on several of my garlic plants which now have their stems flat on the ground).   

Someone I know used to grow a lot of onions (a huge patch) and he'd leave the stems on and store them hanging up in bunches by the stems up towards the ceiling of his shed
« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 04:49:34 pm by sea-dove »
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2017, 07:12:24 am »

An old dude here told me any pumpkins planted before the new year will mainly have male flowers Rob. Do not know how right it is. Out vine is crazy big and growing with little pumpkin set so far.
But I have seen vines growing in crap soil with little care and 100's of pumpkins on it.
I suspect there is some witchcraft involved the same as the garlic! :o >:( ;D ;D ;D
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Loose ends make my arse itch and I have just clipped my finger nails. So the itch flows to my trigger finger.

Pigdog

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2017, 10:57:41 am »

I find if I don't hand pollinate pumpkins and zucchini, they just rot on the vine. When I do hand pollinate every fruit is harvested.
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grenadier

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2017, 05:00:04 pm »

Hey Pigdog, do you have bees locally? At least hand pollinating pumpkins and zooks is easier than strawberries.
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doomsdayprepper4570

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #27 on: November 07, 2017, 05:28:16 pm »

I have two native beehives in the orchard plus fly in european bees as well.
The problem is there are no female flowers!
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Loose ends make my arse itch and I have just clipped my finger nails. So the itch flows to my trigger finger.

grenadier

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2017, 09:52:03 pm »

I find the male flowers arrive a couple of weeks before the female (on pumpkin), The female are often hidden under leaves. Regarding planting different varieties, I think most of you are aware that there are 3 distinct types that can be grown alongside each other without the risk of cross pollenisation. The maxima types such as jarrahdales and qld blues can grow along side japs alongside butternuts.
Don't take my word for it, I suggest you do your own research.
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sea-dove

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Re: Throwaway gardening
« Reply #29 on: November 07, 2017, 11:12:29 pm »

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I have given up on garlic :(
Spent a fortune on commercial stock and all had wet bum and rotted even with severely reduced watering. I think it is a disease in the soil.

That's what you are probably doing wrong.. watering it.  You are probably paying it too much attention. Should test this out by placing a clove in the garden and then forgetting about it and see what happens (I have elephant garlic, I don't know if that is hardier then the other kind or not).   Mine dies back in summer as I never water my garlic here in SA but it always grows back and with more.
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